PSHE Policy

Parklands Primary School

PSHE Policy

1. Aims

At Parklands Primary School, we recognise the importance of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education and the role it plays in developing our pupils into healthy, independent, and responsible individuals who are prepared for life and work. Our curriculum builds upon the children’s first stages of development through progressive and sequenced topics, which revolve around three key themes: relationships, health and wellbeing and living in the wider world. Within the study of PSHE, our children develop the knowledge, skills, and attributes they need to manage their lives, now and in the future.

The quality PSHE that not only is taught but embedded in our ethos at Parklands Primary School ensures children are given wide perspectives to the diverse society that we live in today. Pupils develop fully as:

  • individuals as they focus on their own personal development; believing in themselves, building resilience, developing habits to lead a healthy life.
  • members of families and social communities; understanding how to relate to others and adopt teamwork skills
  • members of economic communities; developing their awareness of the part that they play and how to live responsibly.

It is essential that we teach PSHE to provide the link between pupils’ health and wellbeing, and their academic progress. We know the value of focusing on promoting positive behaviour, mental health, wellbeing, resilience, and achievement will impact their whole education.

 

2. Statutory requirements

PSHE is a non-statutory subject. However, there are aspects of it we are required to teach.

 

3. Content and delivery

3.1 What we teach

As stated above, we are required to cover the content for relationships education, and health education, as set out in the statutory guidance (linked to above).

Refer to our sex and relationships education (RSE) policy for details about what we teach, and how we decide on what to teach, in this subject. This can be found on the school website.

For other aspects of PSHE, including health education, see the attached curriculum map for more details about what we teach in each year.

 

 

3.2 How we teach it

In the Early Years Foundation Stage there are seven different areas of learning and a variety of structured play and practical activities are planned to help children develop in the following areas of learning:

  • communication and language
  • physical development
  • personal, social and emotional development
  • literacy
  • mathematics
  • understanding the world
  • expressive arts and design​

PSHE is referred to as the personal, social and emotional development aspect. This area of a child’s learning is concerned with wellbeing – knowing who they are, where they fit in and feeling good about themselves.

 

In Key Stage One and Two, PSHE is taught discretely for one hour a week, although, aspects of the PSHE curriculum are folded into other parts of the curriculum (such as science and RE) and covered as part of our wider school offer, such as in whole school assemblies. In year 5 and 6, external agencies may deliver parts of the RSE curriculum towards the end of the year.

As Parklands Primary School has chosen to follow and adapt the PSHE teaching units from the Coram Life Education SCARF programme, we are certain that we offer a comprehensive PSHE curriculum that covers the statutory requirements, PSHE learning opportunities as well as the needs of our children.

SCARF is designed as a spiral curriculum that helps children to develop the knowledge and understanding, life skills, attitudes, and values which they will use in a range of situations now and as they grow older. By ensuring that children receive this spiral curriculum, where the same key themes are taught each year, they can apply their learning to age-relevant scenarios, helping them to make healthy decisions and keep themselves and others safe.

To achieve this, several teaching strategies may be used:

  • Establishing ground rules with pupils
  • Dealing with children’s questions in an appropriate manner
  • Using discussion and the appropriate materials
  • Encouraging reflection
  • Using strategies for pupils who may not wish to raise suggestions in front of others e.g. a question style box.
  • Teachers set clear parameters with children about appropriate questions for whole class discussion. If a teacher believes that a question is inappropriate for discussion within the class group, he or she may suggest that the question is more suitable to ask a parent/carer. The teacher will discuss this with individual parents

 

At Parklands, we believe that high quality PSHE is every child’s right, no matter what their level of need or ability. Therefore, we have ensured that all lessons have been adapted accordingly to include all pupils.

 

The personal beliefs and attitudes of teachers will not influence the teaching of PSHE. The approach to the teaching of this subject matter is rooted in education, rather than beliefs or emotion. A balanced and non-judgmental approach will be taken. Teachers, and all those contributing to PSHE, will work to the agreed values within this policy. Teachers can raise any concerns about their ability to teach certain areas of the curriculum without letting their personal beliefs and attitudes affect them.

Half-termly assessments will be made using steps on Target Tracker and the PSHE leader and head teacher will monitor these. Progress to parents will be reported in end of year reports and as part of parent evenings consultations.

 

4. Roles and responsibilities

4.1 The governing board

The governing board will approve the PSHE policy and hold the headteacher and PSHE coordinator to account for its implementation.

4.2 The headteacher

The headteacher is responsible for ensuring that PSHE is taught consistently across the school.

4.3 Staff

Staff are responsible for:

  • Delivering PSHE in a sensitive way
  • Modelling positive attitudes to PSHE
  • Monitoring progress using Target Tracker half termly
  • Responding to the needs of individual pupils

4.4 Pupils

Pupils are expected to engage fully in PSHE and, when discussing issues related to PSHE, treat others with respect and sensitivity.

 

5. Monitoring arrangements

The delivery of PSHE is monitored by Lisa Farrow and Mary MacCool (PSHE leaders) through:

  • Planned scrutinies
  • Learning walks
  • Lesson observations
  • Pupil, staff, and parent questionnaires
  • Pupil interviews
  • Data analysis using Target Tracker

Pupils’ development in PSHE is monitored as part of our internal assessment systems.

This policy will be reviewed by Lisa Farrow and Mary MacCool (PSHE leaders) every three years. At every review, the policy will be approved by the governing board and headteacher.

 

6. Links with other policies

This policy links to the following policies and procedures:

  • Sex and relationships education policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PSHE Curriculum Map

 

 

Nursery

(FS1)

Autumn Me and My Relationships

 

●        Children explore what they like doing and what they do not like.

●        Explore self-portraits and what we look like. Discuss similarities and differences

●        Children to think about their bodies and name body parts. E.g. Do you know any words for your body? Can you tell us what this is? (Pointing to different parts of your body, e.g. elbow).

●        Children understand that some parts of the body are private.

●        Children explore using their senses and use vocabulary linked to the senses, comparing one another’s likes and dislikes.

●        Children understand that they are special

●        Explore feelings and know that we can have lots of different types of feelings. Sometimes at the same time. E.g. How are you feeling now?  “I feel…because…” Who can help us if we’re not feeling ok?

●        Children understand people that are special to them

●        Explore how they feel with their family and how they are special to them E.g. Does everyone’s family look the same? Does everyone’s family feel the same?

 

Valuing Difference

 

·         Children explore appearance and compare what they and other look like E.g. Do we all look the same on the outside? Are we all the same on the inside?

·         Children recognise similarities and differences between themselves and others

·         Children compare and describe the similarities and differences.

·         Children identify what is special about them and their families.

·         Children understand that not everyone’s family is the same; that they look different, made up of different people.

·         Children identify hat is special about the people that live in their home.

Spring Keeping Myself Safe

 

·         Children to explore which people keep them safe. E.g. Who are the people who look after you? Is there anyone at school/nursery who helps you? When do these people help us?

·         Children to identify physical feelings and match them to the correct vocabulary e.g. what does it feel like inside when I am angry? Or sad? Or worried?

·         Children to describe and react to what they feel. E.g. If we feel worried or unsafe does our tummy feel different?

·         Children to understand that if they are feeling sad/worried/scared it’s important that they tell a trusted grown up.

·         Children know who they can speak to if they feel worried or unsafe.

·         Children know who else in the community they can trust to help them (e.g. doctors, nurses, fire fighters, police officers and paramedics etc.)

·         Children know how to keep safe inside and outside.

·         Children know what things are safe to go into their bodies (e.g. medicine, cleaning products etc.)

Children understand that there are also other things we can do to help our bodies if we are feeling unwell

 

Rights and Responsibilities

 

·         To understand the difference between a healthy snack and an unhealthy snack.

·         Children know to wash their hands before touching food items and eating

·         Children know that often through our hands and bodies that germs spread to others.

·         children can identify different emotions

·         Children can identify the similarities and differences in theirs and others families.

·         Children know how to look after items in the classroom

·         Children to show you how to care for the classroom.

Children know what to look after in the environment E.g. Are you caring for our classroom? Are you looking after the living things?

Summer Being My Best

 

·         Explore the importance of food, water, exercise and sleep.

·         Children know that healthy food and water gives our bodies the energy to make us feel great and ready to learn.

·         Discuss the effect of exercise on their body and how they feel (physically and mentally) afterwards.

·         Children know some of the things that help their bodies

·         Children encourage and help others around them.

Growing and Changing

 

·         Learning about how plants and animals change and grow.

·         When it gets warmer the plants and trees grow, animals are born and our world looks different and changes.

·         To compare a young animal with its adult counterpart.

·         To recognise the differences and how they have changed since being a baby.

·         To know that boys and girls are different and like and do different things.

To girls and boys have different private parts.

 

 

 

 

Rec

(FS2)

Autumn Me and My Relationships

 

  • Talk about their own interests.
  • Talk about their families.
  • Name special people in their lives.
  • Understand that we have different special people.
  • Name key people outside of families that care for them.
  • Talk about how they are the same or different to others.
  • Talk about similarities and differences.
  • Describe different feelings and Identify who can help if they are sad, worried or scared.
  • Identify ways to help others or themselves if they are sad or worried.
  • Talk about when they might feel unsafe or unhappy.
  • Name the people who will help them.
  • Notice when a friend is in need at school and help them.
  • Identify events that can make a person feel sad.
  • Suggest ways in which they can help a friend who is sad.
  • Choose ways to help themselves when they feel sad.

 

Valuing Difference 

 

  • Be sensitive towards others and celebrate what makes each person unique.
  • Recognise that we can have things in common with others.
  • Use speaking and listening skills to learn about the lives of their peers.
  • Know the importance of showing care and kindness towards others.
  • Demonstrate skills in building friendships and cooperation.
  • Describe their own positive attributes.
  • Share their likes and dislikes.
  • Listen to and respect the ideas of others.
  • Recognise the similarities and differences amongst their peers.
  • Talk about their family, customs and traditions.
  • Recognise the similarities and differences between their home and those of others.
  • Talk about what makes their home feel special and safe
Spring Keeping Myself Safe

 

  • Talk about how to keep their bodies healthy and safe.
  • Name ways to stay safe around medicines.
  • Name the safe ways to store medicine and who can give it to children (adults).
  • Know how to stay safe in their home, classroom and outside.
  • Know age-appropriate ways to stay safe online.
  • Share ideas about activities that are safe to do on electronic devices.
  • What to do and who to talk to if they feel unsafe online.
  • Name adults in their lives and those in their community who keep them safe.
  • Name things that keep their bodies clean and protected.
  • Make safe decisions about items they don’t recognise.
  • Talk about what our bodies need to stay well.
  • Name some hazards and ways to stay safe inside and outside.
  • Show how to care for the safety of others.
  • Name the adults who they can ask for help from, and will keep them safe.
  • Recognise the feelings they have when they are unsafe.
  • Talk about keeping themselves safe, safe touches and consent.
  • Name the people in their lives who help to keep them safe.
  • Name people in their community who help to keep them safe.
  • Talk about ways to keep themselves safe in their environment.

 

 

Rights and Responsibilities

·         Understand that they can make a difference

·         Identify how they can care for their home, school and special people.

·         Talk about how they can make an impact on the natural world.

·         Talk about similarities and differences between themselves.

·         Demonstrate building relationships with friends.

·         Name the special people in their lives.

·         Understand that our special people can be different to those of others.

·         Talk about why friends are important and how they help us.

·         Identify ways to care for a friend in need.

·         Identify ways to help others in their community.

·         Identify ways in which they help at home.

·         Recognise the importance of taking care of a shared environment.

·         Name ways in which they can look after their learning environment.

·         Identify ways in which they help at home.

·         Recognise the importance of taking care of a shared environment.

·         Name ways in which they can look after their learning environment.

·         Think about what makes the world special and beautiful.

·         Name ways in which they can help take care of the environment, e.g. recycling, saving energy, wasting less.

·         Talk about what can happen to living things if the world is not cared for.

·         Recognise coins and other items relating to money

·         Identify the uses of money.

Summer Being My Best

·         Feel resilient and confident in their learning.

·         Name and discuss different types of feelings and emotions.

·         Learn and use strategies or skills in approaching challenges.

·         Understand that they can make healthy choices.

·         Name and recognise how healthy choices can keep us well.

·         Share an experience where they haven’t achieved their goal.

·         Develop their confidence and resilience towards having a growth mindset.

·         Name a strategy to overcome a hurdle.

·         Recognise that some skills take time to learn.

·         Plan and review an achievable goal.

·         Celebrate the successes of their peers.

·         Name and choose healthy foods and drink.

·         Understand there are some foods that are a “just sometimes” food or drink (eating in moderation).

·         Explain the jobs of different food groups.

·         Name and choose healthy foods and drink.

·         Describe the changes in their body during exercise and what is happening to their body.

·         Explain how exercise can help us stay well – physically and mentally.

·         Name some ways to keep their body fit and well.

·         Understand why our body needs sleep.

·         Talk about their own bedtime routine

·         Suggest ways to have a calm evening and bedtime routine.

Growing and Changing

·         Understand that there are changes in nature and humans.

·         Name the different stages in childhood and growing up.

·         Understand that babies are made by a man and a woman.

·         Use the correct vocabulary when naming the different parts of the body.

·         Know how to keep themselves safe.

·         Name the different seasons and describe their differences.

·         Explain the changes that occur as seasons change.

·         Talk about how they have grown in resilience.

·         To understand that animals and humans change in appearance over time.

·         Use relevant vocabulary such as egg, seed, baby, grow, change, old, young (and the names for young animals).

·         Make observations and ask questions about living things.

·         Use the language and describe the different life stages of: baby, child, teenager, adult, older age.

·         Talk about their own experience of growing up.

·         Explain that a baby is made by a woman and a man, and grows inside a mother’s tummy.

·         Understand that every family is different.

·         Talk about similarities and differences between themselves and others.

·         Talk about how they have changed as they have grown.

·         Explain the differences between babies, children, and adults.

·         Understand that we are all unique.

·         Name parts of the body (including reproductive parts) using the correct vocabulary.

·         Explain which parts of their body are kept private and safe and why

·         Tell or ask an appropriate adult for help if they feel unsafe.

 

 

 

Year 1 Autumn Me and My Relationships

 

  • Understand that classroom rules help everyone to learn and be safe;
  • Explain their classroom rules and be able to contribute to making these.
  • Recognise how others might be feeling by reading body language/facial expressions;
  • Understand and explain how our emotions can give a physical reaction in our body (e.g. butterflies in the tummy etc.)
  • Identify a range of feelings;
  • Identify how feelings might make us behave:
  • Suggest strategies for someone experiencing ‘not so good’ feelings to manage these.
  • Recognise that people’s bodies and feelings can be hurt;
  • Suggest ways of dealing with different kinds of hurt.
  • Recognise that they belong to various groups and communities such as their family;
  • Explain how these people help us and we can also help them to help us.
  • Identify simple qualities of friendship;
  • Suggest simple strategies for making up.
  • Demonstrate attentive listening skills;
  • Suggest simple strategies for resolving conflict situations
  • Give and receive positive feedback, and experience how this makes them feel.

 

Valuing Difference 

  • Identify the differences and similarities between people;
  • Empathise with those who are different from them;
  • Begin to appreciate the positive aspects of these differences.
  • Explain the difference between unkindness, teasing and bullying;
  • Understand that bullying is usually quite rare.
  • Explain some of their school rules and how those rules help to keep everybody safe.
  • Identify some of the people who are special to them;
  • Recognise and name some of the qualities that make a person special to them.
  • Recognise and explain what is fair and unfair, kind and unkind;
  • Suggest ways they can show kindness to others.
Spring Keeping Myself Safe

  • Understand that the body gets energy from food, water and air (oxygen);
  • Recognise that exercise and sleep are important parts of a healthy lifestyle.
  • Recognise the importance of sleep in maintaining a healthy, balanced lifestyle;
  • Identify simple bedtime routines that promote healthy sleep.
  • Recognise emotions and physical feelings associated with feeling unsafe;
  • Identify people who can help them when they feel unsafe.
  • Recognise the range of feelings that are associated with loss.
  • Understand that medicines can sometimes make people feel better when they’re ill;
  • Explain simple issues of safety and responsibility about medicines and their use.
  • Understand and learn the PANTS rules;
  • Name and know which parts should be private;
  • Explain the difference between appropriate and inappropriate touch;
  • Understand that they have the right to say “no” to unwanted touch;
  • Start thinking about who they trust and who they can ask for help.
  • Basic rules to keep safe online, including what is meant by personal information and what should be kept private; the importance of telling a trusted adult if they come across something that scares them.
  • That sometimes people may behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.
  • About how the internet and digital devices can be used safely to find things out and to communicate with others.
  • About the role of the internet in everyday life
  • That not all information seen online is true.

Rights and Responsibilities

  • Recognise the importance of regular hygiene routines;
  • Sequence personal hygiene routines into a logical order.
  • Identify what they like about the school environment;
  • Recognise who cares for and looks after the school environment.
  • Demonstrate responsibility in looking after something (e.g. a class pet or plant);
  • Explain the importance of looking after things that belong to themselves or to others.
  • Explain where people get money from;
  • List some of the things that money may be spent on in a family home.
  • Recognise that different notes and coins have different monetary value;
  • Explain the importance of keeping money safe;
  • Identify safe places to keep money;
  • Understand the concept of ‘saving money’ (i.e. by keeping it in a safe placed and adding to it).
  • About what is meant by first aid; basic techniques for dealing with common injuries.
Summer Being My Best

  • Recognise the importance of fruit and vegetables in their daily diet;
  • Know that eating at least five portions of vegetables and fruit a day helps to maintain health.
  • Recognise that they may have different tastes in food to others;
  • Select foods from the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate) in order to make a healthy lunch;
  • Recognise which foods we need to eat more of and which we need to eat less of to be healthy.
  • Understand how diseases can spread;
  • Recognise and use simple strategies for preventing the spread of diseases.
  • Recognise that learning a new skill requires practice and the opportunity to fail, safely;
  • Understand the learning line’s use as a simple tool to describe the learning process, including overcoming challenges.
  • Demonstrate attentive listening skills;
  • Suggest simple strategies for resolving conflict situations;
  • Give and receive positive feedback, and experience how this makes them feel.
  • Recognise how a person’s behaviour (including their own) can affect other people.

Growing and Changing

  • Name major internal body parts (heart, lungs, blood, stomach, intestines, brain);
  • Understand and explain the simple bodily processes associated with them.
  • Understand some of the tasks required to look after a baby;
  • Explain how to meet the basic needs of a baby, for example, eye contact, cuddling, washing, changing, feeding.
  • Identify things they could do as a baby, a toddler and can do now;
  • Identify the people who help/helped them at those different stages.
  • Explain the difference between teasing and bullying;
  • Give examples of what they can do if they experience or witness bullying;
  • Say who they could get help from in a bullying situation.
  • Explain the difference between a secret and a nice surprise;
  • Identify situations as being secrets or surprises;
  • Identify who they can talk to if they feel uncomfortable about any secret they are told, or told to keep.
  • Identify parts of the body that are private;
  • Describe ways in which private parts can be kept private;
  • Identify people they can talk to about their private parts.

 

Year 2 Autumn Me and My Relationships

  • Suggest actions that will contribute positively to the life of the classroom;
  • Make and undertake pledges based on those actions.
  • Take part in creating and agreeing classroom rules.
  • Use a range of words to describe feelings;
  • Recognise that people have different ways of expressing their feelings;
  • Identify helpful ways of responding to other’s feelings.
  • Define what is meant by the terms ‘bullying’ and ‘teasing’ showing an understanding of the difference between the two;
  • Identify situations as to whether they are incidents of teasing or bullying.
  • Understand and describe strategies for dealing with bullying:
  • Rehearse and demonstrate some of these strategies.
  • Explain the difference between bullying and isolated unkind behaviour;
  • Recognise that that there are different types of bullying and unkind behaviour;
  • Understand that bullying and unkind behaviour are both unacceptable ways of behaving.
  • Recognise that friendship is a special kind of relationship;
  • Identify some of the ways that good friends care for each other.
  • Recognise, name and understand how to deal with feelings (e.g. anger, loneliness);
  • Explain where someone could get help if they were being upset by someone else’s behaviour.

Valuing Difference 

  • Identify some of the physical and non-physical differences and similarities between people;
  • Know and use words and phrases that show respect for other people.
  • Recognise and explain how a person’s behaviour can affect other people.
  • Identify people who are special to them;
  • Explain some of the ways those people are special to them.
  • Explain how it feels to be part of a group;
  • Explain how it feels to be left out from a group;
  • Identify groups they are part of;
  • Suggest and use strategies for helping someone who is feeling left out.
  • Recognise and describe acts of kindness and unkindness;
  • Explain how these impact on other people’s feelings;
  • Suggest kind words and actions they can show to others;
  • Show acts of kindness to others in school.
  • Demonstrate active listening techniques (making eye contact, nodding head, making positive noises, not being distracted);
  • Suggest strategies for dealing with a range of common situations requiring negotiation skills to help foster and maintain positive relationships.
Spring Keeping Myself Safe

  • Understand that medicines can sometimes make people feel better when they’re ill;
  • Give examples of some of the things that a person can do to feel better without use of medicines, if they are unwell;
  • Explain simple issues of safety and responsibility about medicines and their use.
  • Identify situations in which they would feel safe or unsafe;
  • Suggest actions for dealing with unsafe situations including who they could ask for help.
  • Identify situations in which they would need to say ‘Yes’, ‘No’, ‘I’ll ask’, or ‘I’ll tell’, in relation to keeping themselves and others safe.
  • Recognise that body language and facial expression can give clues as to how comfortable and safe someone feels in a situation;
  • Identify the types of touch they like and do not like;
  • Identify who they can talk to if someone touches them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.
  • Recognise that some touches are not fun and can hurt or be upsetting;
  • Know that they can ask someone to stop touching them;
  • Identify who they can talk to if someone touches them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.
  • Identify safe secrets (including surprises) and unsafe secrets;
  • Recognise the importance of telling someone they trust about a secret which makes them feel unsafe or uncomfortable.
  • Identify how inappropriate touch can make someone feel;
  • Understand that there are unsafe secrets and secrets that are nice surprises
  • Explain that if someone is being touched in a way that they don’t like they have to tell someone in their safety network so they can help it stop.

Rights and Responsibilities

·         Describe and record strategies for getting on with others in the classroom.

·         Explain, and be able to use, strategies for dealing with impulsive behaviour.

·         Identify special people in the school and community who can help to keep them safe;

·         Know how to ask for help.

·         Identify what they like about the school environment;

·         Identify any problems with the school environment (e.g. things needing repair);

·         Make suggestions for improving the school environment;

·         Recognise that they all have a responsibility for helping to look after the school environment.

·         Understand that people have choices about what they do with their money;

·         Know that money can be saved for a use at a future time;

·         Explain how they might feel when they spend money on different things.

·         Recognise that money can be spent on items which are essential or non-essential;

·         Know that money can be saved for a future time and understand the reasons why people (including themselves) might do this.

·         Basic rules to keep safe online, including what is meant by personal information and what should be kept private; the importance of telling a trusted adult if they come across something that scares them.

·         To recognise that some things are private and the importance of respecting privacy; that parts of their body covered by underwear are private.

·         That sometimes people may behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

Summer Being My Best

  • Explain the stages of the learning line showing an understanding of the learning process;
  • Help themselves and others develop a positive attitude that support their wellbeing;
  • Identify and describe where they are on the learning line in a given activity and apply its positive mindset strategies to their own learning.
  • Understand and give examples of things they can choose themselves and things that others choose for them;
  • Explain things that they like and dislike, and understand that they have choices about these things;
  • Understand and explain that some choices can be either healthy or unhealthy and can make a difference to their own health.
  • Explain how germs can be spread;
  • Describe simple hygiene routines such as hand washing;
  • Understand that vaccinations can help to prevent certain illnesses.
  • Explain the importance of good dental hygiene;
  • Describe simple dental hygiene routines.
  • Understand that the body gets energy from food, water and oxygen;
  • Recognise that exercise and sleep are important to health
  • Name major internal body parts (heart, blood, lungs, stomach, small and large intestines, brain);
  • Describe how food, water and air get into the body and blood.
Growing and Changing
  • Demonstrate simple ways of giving positive feedback to others.
  • Recognise the range of feelings that are associated with losing (and being reunited) with a person they are close to.
  • Identify different stages of growth (e.g. baby, toddler, child, teenager, adult);
  • Understand and describe some of the things that people are capable of at these different stages.
  • Identify which parts of the human body are private;
  • Explain that a person’s genitals help them to make babies when they are grown up;
  • Understand that humans mostly have the same body parts but that they can look different from person to person.
  • Explain what privacy means;
  • Know that you are not allowed to touch someone’s private belongings without their permission;
  • Give examples of different types of private information.
  • About what is meant by first aid; basic techniques for dealing with common injuries.

 

 

 

Year 3 Autumn Me and My Relationships

●        Explain why we have rules;

●        Explore why rules are different for different age groups, in particular for internet-based activities;

●        Suggest appropriate rules for a range of settings;

●        Consider the possible consequences of breaking the rules.

●        Explain some of the feelings someone might have when they lose something important to them;

●        Understand that these feelings are normal and a way of dealing with the situation.

●        Define and demonstrate cooperation and collaboration;

●        Identify the different skills that people can bring to a group task;

●        Demonstrate how working together in a collaborative manner can help everyone to achieve success.

●        Identify people who they have a special relationship with;

●        Suggest strategies for maintaining a positive relationship with their special people.

●        Rehearse and demonstrate simple strategies for resolving given conflict situations.

●        Explain what a dare is;

●        Understand that no-one has the right to force them to do a dare;

●        Suggest strategies to use if they are ever made to feel uncomfortable or unsafe by someone asking them to do a dare.

●        Express opinions and listen to those of others;

●        Consider others’ points of view;

●        Practise explaining the thinking behind their ideas and opinions.

●        Identify qualities of friendship;

●        Suggest reasons why friends sometimes fall out;

●        Rehearse and use, now or in the future, skills for making up again.

Valuing Difference

●        Recognise that there are many different types of family;

●        Understand what is meant by ‘adoption’ ‘fostering’ and ‘same-sex relationships.’

●        Define the term ‘community’;

●        Identify the different communities that they belong to;

●        Recognise the benefits that come with belonging to a community, in particular the benefit to mental health and wellbeing.

●        Reflect on listening skills;

●        Give examples of respectful language;

●        Give examples of how to challenge another’s viewpoint, respectfully.

●        Explain that people living in the UK have different origins;

●        Identify similarities and differences between a diverse range of people from varying national, regional, ethnic and religious backgrounds;

●        Identity some of the qualities that people from a diverse range of backgrounds need in order to get on together.

●        Recognise the factors that make people similar to and different from each other;

●        Recognise that repeated name calling is a form of bullying;

●        Suggest strategies for dealing with name calling (including talking to a trusted adult).

●        Understand and explain some of the reasons why different people are bullied;

●        Explore why people have prejudiced views and understand what this is.

Year 3 Spring Keeping Myself Safe

●        Identify situations which are safe or unsafe;

●        Identify people who can help if a situation is unsafe;

●        Suggest strategies for keeping safe.

●        Define the words danger and risk and explain the difference between the two;

●        Demonstrate strategies for dealing with a risky situation.

●        Identify some key risks from and effects of cigarettes and alcohol;

●        Know that most people choose not to smoke cigarettes; (Social Norms message)

●        Define the word ‘drug’ and understand that nicotine and alcohol are both drugs.

●        Identify risk factors in given situations;

●        Suggest ways of reducing or managing those risks.

●        Evaluate the validity of statements relating to online safety;

●        Recognise potential risks associated with browsing online;

●        Give examples of strategies for safe browsing online.

●        Know that our body can often give us a sign when something doesn’t feel right; to trust these signs and talk to a trusted adult if this happens;

●        Recognise and describe appropriate behaviour online as well as offline;

●        Identify what constitutes personal information and when it is not appropriate or safe to share this;

●        Understand and explain how to get help in a situation where requests for images or information of themselves or others occurs.

●        Demonstrate strategies for assessing risks;

●        Understand and explain decision-making skills;

●        Understand where to get help from when making decisions.

●        Understand that medicines are drugs and suggest ways that they can be helpful or harmful.

Rights and Responsibilities

●        Define what a volunteer is;

●        Identify people who are volunteers in the school community;

●        Recognise some of the reasons why people volunteer, including mental health and wellbeing benefits to those who volunteer.

●        Identify key people who are responsible for them to stay safe and healthy;

●        Suggest ways they can help these people.

●        Understand the difference between ‘fact’ and ‘opinion’;

●        Understand how an event can be perceived from different viewpoints;

●        Plan, draft and publish a recount using the appropriate language.

●        Define what is meant by the environment;

●        Evaluate and explain different methods of looking after the school environment;

●        Devise methods of promoting their priority method.

●        Understand the terms ‘income’, ‘saving’ and ‘spending’;

●        Recognise that there are times we can buy items we want and times when we need to save for items;

●        Suggest items and services around the home that need to be paid for (e.g. food, furniture, electricity etc.)

●        Explain that people earn their income through their jobs;

●        Understand that the amount people get paid is due to a range of factors (skill, experience, training, responsibility etc.)

 

Year 3 Summer Being My Best

●        Explain how each of the food groups on the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate) benefits the body;

●        Explain what is meant by the term ‘balanced diet’;

●        Give examples what foods might make up a healthy balanced meal.

●        Explain how some infectious illnesses are spread from one person to another;

●        Explain how simple hygiene routines can help to reduce the risk of the spread of infectious illnesses;

●        Suggest medical and non-medical ways of treating an illness.

●        Develop skills in discussion and debating an issue;

●        Demonstrate their understanding of health and wellbeing issues that are relevant to them;

●        Empathise with different view points;

●        Make recommendations, based on their research.

●        Identify their achievements and areas of development;

●        Recognise that people may say kind things to help us feel good about ourselves;

●        Explain why some groups of people are not represented as much on television/in the media.

●        Demonstrate how working together in a collaborative manner can help everyone to achieve success;

●        Understand and explain how the brain sends and receives messages through the nerves.

●        Name major internal body parts (heart, blood, lungs, stomach, small and large intestines, liver, brain);

●        Describe how food, water and air get into the body and blood.

●        Explain some of the different talents and skills that people have and how skills are developed;

●        Recognise their own skills and those of other children in the class.

 

Growing and Changing

●        Identify different types of relationships;

●        Recognise who they have positive healthy relationships with.

●        Understand what is meant by the term body space (or personal space);

●        Identify when it is appropriate or inappropriate to allow someone into their body space;

●        Rehearse strategies for when someone is inappropriately in their body space.

●        Define the terms ‘secret’ and ‘surprise’ and know the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;

●        Recognise how different surprises and secrets might make them feel;

●        Know who they could ask for help if a secret made them feel uncomfortable or unsafe.

●        Recognise that babies come from the joining of an egg and sperm;

●        Explain what happens when an egg doesn’t meet a sperm;

●        Understand that for girls, periods are a normal part of puberty.

 

 

 

Year 4 Autumn Me and My Relationships

●        Describe ‘good’ and ‘not so good’ feelings and how feelings can affect our physical state;

●        Explain how different words can express the intensity of feelings.

●        Explain what we mean by a ‘positive, healthy relationship’;

●        Describe some of the qualities that they admire in others.

●        Recognise that there are times when they might need to say ‘no’ to a friend;

●        Describe appropriate assertive strategies for saying ‘no’ to a friend.

●        Demonstrate strategies for working on a collaborative task;

●        Define successful qualities of teamwork and collaboration.

●        Identify a wide range of feelings;

●        Recognise that different people can have different feelings in the same situation;

●        Explain how feelings can be linked to physical state.

●        Demonstrate a range of feelings through their facial expressions and body language;

●        Recognise that their feelings might change towards someone or something once they have further information.

●        Give examples of strategies to respond to being bullied, including what people can do and say;

●        Understand and give examples of who or where pressure to behave in an unhealthy, unacceptable or risky way might come from.

Valuing Difference

●        Define the terms ‘negotiation’ and ‘compromise’;

●        Understand the need to manage conflict or differences and suggest ways of doing this, through negotiation and compromise.

●        Understand that they have the right to protect their personal body space;

●        Recognise how others’ non-verbal signals indicate how they feel when people are close to their body space;

●        Suggest people they can talk to if they feel uncomfortable with other people’s actions towards them.

●        Recognise that they have different types of relationships with people they know (e.g. close family, wider family, friends, acquaintances);

●        Give examples of features of these different types of relationships, including how they influence what is shared.

●        List some of the ways that people are different to each other (including differences of race, gender, religion);

●        Recognise potential consequences of aggressive behaviour;

●        Suggest strategies for dealing with someone who is behaving aggressively

●        List some of the ways in which people are different to each other (including ethnicity, gender, religious beliefs, customs and festivals);

●        Define the word respect and demonstrate ways of showing respect to others’ differences.

●        Understand and identify stereotypes, including those promoted in the media.

Year 4 Spring Keeping Myself Safe

●        Define the terms ‘danger’, ‘risk’ and ‘hazard’ and explain the difference between them;

●        Identify situations which are either dangerous, risky or hazardous;

●        Suggest simple strategies for managing risk.

●        Identify images that are safe/unsafe to share online;

●        Know and explain strategies for safe online sharing;

●        Understand and explain the implications of sharing images online without consent.

●        Define what is meant by the word ‘dare’;

●        Identify from given scenarios which are dares and which are not;

●        Suggest strategies for managing dares.

●        Understand that medicines are drugs;

●        Explain safety issues for medicine use;

●        Suggest alternatives to taking a medicine when unwell;

●        Suggest strategies for limiting the spread of infectious diseases (e.g. hand-washing routines).

●        Understand some of the key risks and effects of smoking and drinking alcohol;

●        Understand that increasing numbers of young people are choosing not to smoke and that not all people drink alcohol (Social Norms theory).

●        Describe stages of identifying and managing risk;

●        Suggest people they can ask for help in managing risk.

●        Understand that we can be influenced both positively and negatively;

●        Give examples of some of the consequences of behaving in an unacceptable, unhealthy or risky way.

Rights and Responsibilities

●        Explain how different people in the school and local community help them stay healthy and safe;

●        Define what is meant by ‘being responsible’;

●        Describe the various responsibilities of those who help them stay healthy and safe;

●        Suggest ways they can help the people who keep them healthy and safe.

●        Understand that humans have rights and also responsibilities;

●        Identify some rights and also responsibilities that come with these.

●        Understand the reason we have rules;

●        Suggest and engage with ways that they can contribute to the decision-making process in school (e.g. through pupil voice/school council);

●        Recognise that everyone can make a difference within a democratic process.

●        Define the word influence;

●        Recognise that reports in the media can influence the way they think about a topic;

●        Form and present their own opinions based on factual information and express or present these in a respectful and courteous manner.

●        Explain the role of the bystander and how it can influence bullying or other anti-social behaviour;

●        Recognise that they can play a role in influencing outcomes of situations by their actions.

●        Understand some of the ways that various national and international environmental organisations work to help take care of the environment;

●        Understand and explain the value of this work.

●        Define the terms ‘income’ and ‘expenditure’;

●        List some of the items and services of expenditure in the school and in the home;

●        Prioritise items of expenditure in the home from most essential to least essential.

●        Explain what is meant by the terms ‘income tax’, ‘National Insurance’ and ‘VAT’;

●        Understand how a payslip is laid out showing both pay and deductions;

●        Prioritise public services from most essential to least essential.

Year 4 Summer Being My Best

●        Identify ways in which everyone is unique;

●        Appreciate their own uniqueness;

●        Recognise that there are times when they will make the same choices as their friends and times when they will choose differently.

●        Give examples of choices they make for themselves and choices others make for them;

●        Recognise that there are times when they will make the same choices as their friends and times when they will choose differently.

●        Understand that the body gets energy from food, water and oxygen and that exercise and sleep are important to our health;

●        Plan a menu which gives a healthy balanced of foods from across the food groups on the Eatwell Guide (formerly Eatwell Plate).

●        Understand the ways in which they can contribute to the care of the environment (using some or all of the seven Rs);

●        Suggest ways the Seven Rs recycling methods can be applied to different scenarios.

●        Define what is meant by the word ‘community’;

●        Suggest ways in which different people support the school community;

●        Identify qualities and attributes of people who support the school community.

Growing and Changing

●        Describe some of the changes that happen to people during their lives;

●        Explain how the Learning Line can be used as a tool to help them manage change more easily;

●        Suggest people who may be able to help them deal with change.

●        Name some positive and negative feelings;

●        Understand how the onset of puberty can have emotional as well as physical impact

●        Suggest reasons why young people sometimes fall out with their parents;

●        Take part in a role play practising how to compromise.

●        Identify parts of the body that males and females have in common and those that are different;

●        Know the correct terminology for their genitalia;

●        Understand and explain why puberty happens.

●        Know the key facts of the menstrual cycle;

●        Understand that periods are a normal part of puberty for girls;

●        Identify some of the ways to cope better with periods.

●        Define the terms ‘secret’ and ‘surprise’ and know the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;

●        Recognise how different surprises and secrets might make them feel;

●        Know who they could ask for help if a secret made them feel uncomfortable or unsafe.

●        Understand that marriage is a commitment to be entered into freely and not against someone’s will;

●        Recognise that marriage includes same sex and opposite sex partners;

●        Know the legal age for marriage in England or Scotland;

●        Discuss the reasons why a person would want to be married, or live together, or have a civil ceremony.

 

Year 5 Autumn Me and My Relationships

●        Explain what collaboration means;

●        Give examples of how they have worked collaboratively;

●        Describe the attributes needed to work collaboratively.

●        Explain what is meant by the terms negotiation and compromise;

●        Describe strategies for resolving difficult issues or situations.

●        Demonstrate how to respond to a wide range of feelings in others;

●        Give examples of some key qualities of friendship;

●        Reflect on their own friendship qualities.

●        Identify what things make a relationship unhealthy;

●        Identify who they could talk to if they needed help.

●        Identify characteristics of passive, aggressive and assertive behaviours;

●        Understand and rehearse assertiveness skills.

●        Recognise basic emotional needs, understand that they change according to circumstance;

●        Identify risk factors in a given situation (involving smoking or other scenarios) and consider outcomes of risk taking in this situation, including emotional risks.

●        Understand that online communication can be misinterpreted;

●        Accept that responsible and respectful behaviour is necessary when interacting with others online as well as face-to-face.

Valuing Difference

●        Define some key qualities of friendship;

●        Describe ways of making a friendship last;

●        Explain why friendships sometimes end.

●        Rehearse active listening skills:

●        Demonstrate respectfulness in responding to others;

●        Respond appropriately to others.

●        Develop an understanding of discrimination and its injustice, and describe this using examples;

●        Empathise with people who have been, and currently are, subjected to injustice, including through racism;

●        Consider how discriminatory behaviour can be challenged.

●        Identify and describe the different groups that make up their school/wider community/other parts of the UK;

●        Describe the benefits of living in a diverse society;

●        Explain the importance of mutual respect for different faiths and beliefs and how we demonstrate this.

●        Understand that the information we see online, either text or images, is not always true or accurate;

●        Recognise that some people post things online about themselves that aren’t true, sometimes this is so that people will like them;

●        Understand and explain the difference between sex, gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation.

●        Identify the consequences of positive and negative behaviour on themselves and others;

●        Give examples of how individual/group actions can impact on others in a positive or negative way.

 

Year 5 Spring Keeping Myself Safe

●        Explain what a habit is, giving examples;

●        Describe why and how a habit can be hard to change.

●        Recognise that there are positive and negative risks;

●        Explain how to weigh up risk factors when making a decision;

●        Describe some of the possible outcomes of taking a risk.

●        Demonstrate strategies to deal with both face-to-face and online bullying;

●        Demonstrate strategies and skills for supporting others who are bullied;

●        Recognise and describe the difference between online and face-to-face bullying.

●        Define what is meant by a dare;

●        Explain why someone might give a dare;

●        Suggest ways of standing up to someone who gives a dare.

●        Recognise which situations are risky;

●        Explore and share their views about decision making  when faced with a risky situation;

●        Suggest what someone should do when faced with a risky situation.

●        Consider what information is safe/unsafe to share offline and online, and reflect on the consequences of not keeping personal information private;

●        Recognise that people aren’t always who they appear to be online and explain risks of being friends online with a person they have not met face-to-face;

●        Know how to protect personal information online;

●        Recognise disrespectful behaviour online and know how to respond to it.

●        Understand some of the complexities of categorising drugs;

●        Know that all medicines are drugs but not all drugs are medicines;

●        Understand ways in which medicines can be helpful or harmful and used safely or unsafely.

●        Understand the actual norms around smoking and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.

●        Identify risk factors in a given situation (involving smoking) and consider outcomes of risk taking in this situation, including emotional risks;

●        Understand the actual norms around smoking/alcohol and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.

 

Rights and Responsibilities

●        Identify, write and discuss issues currently in the media concerning health and wellbeing;

●        Express their opinions on an issue concerning health and wellbeing;

●        Make recommendations on an issue concerning health and wellbeing.

●        Understand the difference between a fact and an opinion;

●        Understand what biased reporting is and the need to think critically about things we read.

●        Define the differences between responsibilities, rights and duties;

●        Discuss what can make them difficult to follow;

●        Identify the impact on individuals and the wider community if responsibilities are not carried out.

●        Explain what we mean by the terms voluntary, community and pressure (action) group;

●        Give examples of voluntary groups, the kind of work they do and its value.

●        State the costs involved in producing and selling an item;

●        Suggest questions a consumer should ask before buying a product.

●        Define the terms loan, credit, debt and interest;

●        Suggest advice for a range of situations involving personal finance.

●        Explain some of the areas that local councils have responsibility for;

●        Understand that local councillors are elected to represent their local community.

 

Year 5 Summer Being My Best

●        Know two harmful effects each of smoking/drinking alcohol.

●        Explain the importance of food, water and oxygen, sleep and exercise for the human body and its health.

●        Understand the actual norms around smoking and the reasons for common misperceptions of these.

●        Know the basic functions of the four systems covered and know they are inter-related.

●        Explain the function of at least one internal organ.

●        Understand the importance of food, water and oxygen, sleep and exercise for the human body and its health.

●        Identify their own strengths and talents;

●        Identify areas that need improvement and describe strategies for achieving those improvements.

●        State what is meant by community;

●        Explain what being part of a school community means to them;

●        Suggest ways of improving the school community.

●        Identify people who are responsible for helping them stay healthy and safe;

●        Identify ways that they can help these people.

●        Describe ‘star’ qualities of celebrities as portrayed by the media;

●        Recognise that the way people are portrayed in the media isn’t always an accurate reflection of them in real life;

●        Describe ‘star’ qualities that ‘ordinary’ people have.

 

Growing and Changing

●        Use a range of words and phrases to describe the intensity of different feelings

●        Distinguish between good and not so good feelings, using appropriate vocabulary to describe these;

●        Explain strategies they can use to build resilience.

●        Identify people who can be trusted;

●        Understand what kinds of touch are acceptable or unacceptable;

●        Describe strategies for dealing with situations in which they would feel uncomfortable, particularly in relation to inappropriate touch.

●        Explain how someone might feel when they are separated from someone or something they like;

●        Suggest ways to help someone who is separated from someone or something they like.

●        Know the correct words for the external sexual organs;

●        Discuss some of the myths associated with puberty.

●        Identify some products that they may need during puberty and why;

●        Know what menstruation is and why it happens.

●        Recognise how our body feels when we’re relaxed;

●        List some of the ways our body feels when it is nervous or sad;

●        Describe and/or demonstrate how to be resilient in order to find someone who will listen to you.

●        Identify the consequences of positive and negative behaviour on themselves and others;

●        Give examples of how individual/group actions can impact on others in a positive or negative way.

●        Explain the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;

●        Identify situations where someone might need to break a confidence in order to keep someone safe.

●        Recognise that some people can get bullied because of the way they express their gender;

●        Give examples of how bullying behaviours can be stopped.

 

 

 

Year 6 Autumn Me and My Relationships

●        Demonstrate a collaborative approach to a task;

●        Describe and implement the skills needed to do this.

●        Explain what is meant by the terms ‘negotiation’ and ‘compromise’;

●        Suggest positive strategies for negotiating and compromising within a collaborative task;

●        Demonstrate positive strategies for negotiating and compromising within a collaborative task.

●        Recognise some of the challenges that arise from friendships;

●        Suggest strategies for dealing with such challenges demonstrating the need for respect and an assertive approach.

●        List some assertive behaviours;

●        Recognise peer influence and pressure;

●        Demonstrate using some assertive behaviours, through role-play, to resist peer influence and pressure.

●        Recognise and empathise with patterns of behaviour in peer-group dynamics;

●        Recognise basic emotional needs and understand that they change according to circumstance;

●        Suggest strategies for dealing assertively with a situation where someone under pressure may do something they feel uncomfortable about.

●        Describe the consequences of reacting to others in a positive or negative way;

●        Suggest ways that people can respond more positively to others.

●        Describe ways in which people show their commitment to each other;

●        Know the ages at which a person can marry, depending on whether their parents agree;

●        Understand that everyone has the right to be free to choose who and whether to marry.

●        Recognise that some types of physical contact can produce strong negative feelings;

●        Know that some inappropriate touch is also illegal.

●        Identify strategies for keeping personal information safe online;

●        Describe safe and respectful behaviours when using communication technology.

 

Valuing Difference

●        Recognise that bullying and discriminatory behaviour can result from disrespect of people’s differences;

●        Suggest strategies for dealing with bullying, as a bystander;

●        Describe positive attributes of their peers.

●        Know that all people are unique but that we have far more in common with each other than what is different about us;

●        Consider how a bystander can respond to someone being rude, offensive or bullying someone else;

●        Demonstrate ways of offering support to someone who has been bullied .

●        Demonstrate ways of showing respect to others, using verbal and non-verbal communication.

●        Understand and explain the term prejudice;

●        Identify and describe the different groups that make up their school/wider community/other parts of the UK;

●        Describe the benefits of living in a diverse society;

●        Explain the importance of mutual respect for different faiths and beliefs and how we demonstrate this.

●        Explain the difference between a friend and an acquaintance;

●        Describe qualities of a strong, positive friendship;

●        Describe the benefits of other types of relationship (e.g. neighbour, parent/carer, relative).

●        Define what is meant by the term stereotype;

●        Recognise how the media can sometimes reinforce gender stereotypes;

●        Recognise that people fall into a wide range of what is seen as normal;

●        Challenge stereotypical gender portrayals of people.

Year 6 Spring Keeping Myself Safe

●        Accept that responsible and respectful behaviour is necessary when interacting with others online and face-to-face;

●        Understand and describe the ease with which something posted online can spread.

●        Identify strategies for keeping personal information safe online;

●        Describe safe behaviours when using communication technology.

●        Know that it is illegal to create and share sexual images of children under 18 years old;

●        Explore the risks of sharing photos and films of themselves with other people directly or online;

●        Know how to keep their information private online.

●        Define what is meant by addiction, demonstrating an understanding that addiction is a form of behaviour;

●        Understand that all humans have basic emotional needs and explain some of the ways these needs can be met.

●        Explain how drugs can be categorised into different groups depending on their medical and legal context;

●        Demonstrate an understanding that drugs can have both medical and non-medical uses;

●        Explain in simple terms some of the laws that control drugs in this country

●        Understand some of the basic laws in relation to drugs;

●        Explain why there are laws relating to drugs in this country.

●        Understand the actual norms around drinking alcohol and the reasons for common misperceptions of these;

●        Describe some of the effects and risks of drinking alcohol.

●        Understand that all humans have basic emotional needs and explain some of the ways these needs can be met;

●        Explain how these emotional needs impact on people’s behaviour;

●        Suggest positive ways that people can get their emotional need met.

●        Understand and give examples of conflicting emotions;

●        Understand and reflect on how independence and responsibility go together

 

Rights and Responsibilities

●        Define the terms ‘fact’, ‘opinion’, ‘biased’ and ‘unbiased’, explaining the difference between them;

●        Describe the language and techniques that make up a biased report;

●        Analyse a report also extract the facts from it.

●        Know the legal age (and reason behind these) for having a social media account;

●        Understand why people don’t tell the truth and often post only the good bits about themselves, online;

●        Recognise that people’s lives are much more balanced in real life, with positives and negatives.

●        Explain some benefits of saving money;

●        Describe the different ways money can be saved, outlining the pros and cons of each method;

●        Describe the costs that go into producing an item;

●        Suggest sale prices for a variety of items, taking into account a range of factors;

●        Explain what is meant by the term interest.

●        Recognise and explain that different jobs have different levels of pay and the factors that influence this;

●        Explain the different types of tax (income tax and VAT) which help to fund public services;

●        Evaluate the different public services and compare their value.

●        Explain what we mean by the terms voluntary, community and pressure (action) group;

●        Describe the aim, mission statement, activity and beneficiaries of a chosen voluntary, community or action group.

●        Explain what is meant by living in an environmentally sustainable way;

●        Suggest actions that could be taken to live in a more environmentally sustainable way.

Year 6 Summer Being My Best

●        Identify aspirational goals;

●        Describe the actions needed to set and achieve these.

●        Explain what the five ways to wellbeing are;

●        Describe how the five ways to wellbeing contribute to a healthy lifestyle, giving examples of how they can be implemented in people’s lives.

●        Present information they researched on a health and wellbeing issues outlining the key issues and making suggestions for any improvements concerning those issues.

●        Identify risk factors in a given situation;

●        Understand and explain the outcomes of risk-taking in a given situation, including emotional risks.

●        Recognise what risk is;

●        Explain how a risk can be reduced;

●        Understand risks related to growing up and explain the need to be aware of these;

●        Assess a risk to help keep themselves safe.

 

Growing and Changing

●        Recognise some of the changes they have experienced and their emotional responses to those changes;

●        Suggest positive strategies for dealing with change;

●        Identify people who can support someone who is dealing with a challenging time of change.

●        Understand that fame can be short-lived;

●        Recognise that photos can be changed to match society’s view of perfect;

●        Identify qualities that people have, as well as their looks.

●        Define what is meant by the term stereotype;

●        Recognise how the media can sometimes reinforce gender stereotypes;

●        Recognise that people fall into a wide range of what is seen as normal;

●        Challenge stereotypical gender portrayals of people.

●        Understand the risks of sharing images online and how these are hard to control, once shared;

●        Understand that people can feel pressured to behave in a certain way because of the influence of the peer group;

●        Understand the norms of risk-taking behaviour and that these are usually lower than people believe them to be.

●        Define the word ‘puberty’ giving examples of some of the physical and emotional changes associated with it;

●        Suggest strategies that would help someone who felt challenged by the changes in puberty;

●        Understand what FGM is and that it is an illegal practice in this country;

●        Know where someone could get support if they were concerned about their own or another person’s safety.

●        Explain the difference between a safe and an unsafe secret;

●        Identify situations where someone might need to break a confidence in order to keep someone safe.

●        Identify the changes that happen through puberty to allow sexual reproduction to occur;

●        Know a variety of ways in which the sperm can fertilise the egg to create a baby;

●        Know the legal age of consent and what it means.

 

 

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